Your contributions are the lifeblood of the Eye Opener - Every comment or question we publish or referral to a friend entitles you to 1 point in our 20% of Profit Pool
Send us your comments or questions
By Clicking Here

Send this story to a friend
By Clicking Here

The Calgary Eye Opener
*** UNCENSORED BY ADVERTISERS OR GOVERNMENTS ***
www.calgaryeyeopener.com
Email: The_Calgary_Eye_Opener@calgaryeyeopener.com
SPANNING 3 CENTURIES

NOW FREE
Go to our home page
and
Go to our Archives page
CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA
***UPDATED DAILY (IF THE EDITOR IS ON THE WAGON)***

Monday, August 16, 2004

Bread and Circuses - couch potatoes, junk food and Olympic medals

This month, a typical teenager, let's call her "Jill Sloth", will spend five hours per day, munching heavily advertised junk food, hypnotized by a television set, watching the Athens Olympics. There's a 10% to 25% that Jill Sloth is slobbishly fat, does not exercise, has low self-esteem. There's a 20% to 50% chance her parents are fat and hold themselves in low regard. Meantime community sport facilities for unorganized sport are vacant, ordinary communities have no recreational directors. No problem, according to the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Calgary Herald. All Canada needs is to win some Olympic medals. That will boost Jill and Mom and Dad's self-esteem - make 'em feel good - get 'em to think positive.

On Wednesday, Canada's new Minister of Sport, Stephen Owen, an amateur rugby player had the guts to speak out. "I think at the end of the day if we didn't win a medal but we found that the quality of lire, measured by the amount of physical activity and health of the Canadian public was increased, that would be a rally good thing," said Owen on Wednesday.

On Thursday, fearing a loss of funds and perks, the Canadian Olympic establishment protested aplenty. "It's about how many medals we get - absolutely," stated former Olympic competitor, Canadian Olympic Committee perkster Diane Jones Konihowski. "If we win, we're considered successful. If we don't win, we're considered unsuccessful," exploded pompous former Olympic skier and Olympic perk-laden president of Alpine Canada, Ken Read: "No Minister, I disagree. The vast majority of Canadians (presumably hunkered down in sofas and easy chairs munching taco chips and pizza) expect our athletes to do well. It's up to us as leaders in the sports community ... to forcefully put out the message that winning medals is important." Leadership, Ms. Jones Konihowski, Mr. Read? Diane, Ken, you were lucky - you were born with extraordinary athletic ability - you were born to parents who were not couch potatoes - show some real leadership.

On Friday, food sellers and appliance dealers paid the Calgary Herald $6,000 (3 pages estimated at $2,000 per page) to advertise unhealthy food and big screen television sets. The Herald devoted an entire section, festooned with lots of revenue generating ads, to the Olympics. Little, if any, of Friday's Calgary Herald was devoted to healthy, esteem-building recreation. The Calgary Herald's John Gradon writhed with righteous indignation towards Minister Owen. The nonathletic looking Graydon compared former rugby player Owen to Neville Chamberlain (in 1938, Chamberlain delivered Czechoslovakia over to Adolph Hitler). "If [Mr. Owen]had been in charge at the time, the Canadian Pacific Railway would never have been built. Trafalgar would have been lost, D-Day would have been a total failure and we wouldn't have landed on the moon." Thank God, we say, that Gradon was not in charge. A Herald editorial meantime, was satisfied that Canada was spending $62 million per year on Olympic medals, only $48 million on non-elite sports programs for ordinary Canadians.



The Calgary Eye Opener


From the Toolbar at the top of this page make
The Calgary Eye Opener one of your Favourites or Bookmarks

If you enjoyed your read, please recommend the Eye Opener to a friend --- Click Here --- You'll help our circulation and
EARN YOU THE RIGHT TO SHARE IN A POOL OF 20% OF OUR PROFITS.

OTHER EYE OPENER STORIES

© Thomas O. Davis, All Rights Reserved